Saturday, August 28, 2010


England's super soccer pin-up Jamie Redknapp, a star of the brilliant Euro 96 team, is playing the field - and has shown the red card to settling down with just one woman.
The sexy Liverpool midfielder makes no apologies for hitting the town with his mates but says he's Lycra Leggingssuspicious of beauties who try to score with him!
Jamie, 22, says "I'm a lad and I want to go out and play around. What's wrong with that?
"I'm not an angel. That's the way I want to be. You've got to be a bit of a rascal sometimes.
"When women approach me in clubs or wherever, they may seem very genuine but I have to stand back and ask myself, 'Does she like me for me or because I'm famous?'
"I've got to be so careful with people nowadays.
"As far as finding The One for me, I always believe that sooner or later you are going to meet someone and it just happens, so I'll wait.
"People expect footballers to jump into bed with everyone,
but I'm not ready to make a commitment to one girl.
"I'm not sure what I want from a relationship yet so it wouldn't be fair. I want to play the field.
"But I'll be honest with you and say I've been knocked back lots of times and it makes you feel stupid, particularly if your mates are about.
"There's probably a few blokes now thinking, 'Oh yeah, sure you have'. It's true, honest."
But the stylish player, dubbed the Catwalk King by his Anfield team-mates, won't rule out a future lovematch with ex-Eternal singer Louise Nurding. The couple have been inseparable since meeting at a Take That gig about four years ago and Louise admits it's natural to assume they're an item.
"Louise is a great girl, fantastic really. She's brilliant company and I know she's gorgeous," says Jamie.
"People are always telling me we'd be good together so who knows what will happen.
"It's an old line but it just happens to be true - we are just close friends at the moment. Fortunately I get to see a lot of her. We mix in the same circle of friends. But we've both got so much on with our careers that we really couldn't get it together at the moment."
One girlfriend who did grab the headlines was millionaire's daughter Davinia Murphy, who reportedly dumped Jamie for Manchester United star Ryan Giggs.
Jamie says "I went out with her a couple of times, just dates, about two years ago - a long time before she met Ryan.
"But it wasn't a case of her dumping me. It just didn't work out mutually.
"I've had about four steady girlfriends. About six months ago I split up with a girl who was at college in Latex CatsuitsLeeds.
"We just couldn't get it together as boyfriend and girlfriend but we're still friends now - which I'm grateful for."
Jamie, the youngest son of West Ham manager Harry Redknapp, still hasn't come to terms with why his female fans aren't interested in his on-field performance. Every week he gets perfume-scented love notes by the sackful - including letters from girls begging for a date or trying to lure him with lace underwear.
He jokes "All sorts of things go through your mind when you get sent a pair of knickers.
"I think, 'Ooh, is it from Elle Macpherson?' If only!
"I get asked what I do with all the knickers - I wear them, of course!"
Female adoration aside, the kind of praise Jamie really gets excited about is the endorsement of England coach Terry Venables.
When the team beat Scotland 2-0 in a marvellous Euro 96 clash, Jamie was hailed by his coach as the man who turned the game around when he replaced Stuart Pearce at half-time.
Jamie played for 40 minutes before twisting his ankle ligaments and leaving the pitch on a stretcher.
But football experts across the country raved about his calming influence and ability to win the ball and feed Liverpool team-mate Steve McManaman.

Sunday, August 22, 2010

Watches In Men's Fashion

If you thought all the trouble that needs to be taken for fashion is only for women and by women, you have got a lot more thinking to do. Men have stepped into the world of fashion long ago. Yes, long before Sean Connery and Elvis Presley, men were known for their good looks and impeccable dress sense. It did not merely come of wanting to be like women, but more because they also cared about looking good, thereby getting attention, thereby feeling good about themselves. We have all heard of the male ego, and how it can be stroked by a well-placed compliment, and there is no man, or woman for that matter, who would not like to receive a sincere compliment for being dressed to the nines. Thankfully there are a lot of things that men and women can do consciously to bring up their appeal and make themselves look well-groomed if not good looking. And no one should let go of such opportunities. It is well known that better dressed people get paid better and have more friends, leading to happier lives.

But it has to be admitted that men do not have a provision to wear as many accessories as do women. Or, put in another way, men do no wear as much jewelry as women can. They can accessorize in other ways, such as through belts, cummerbunds, ties, cuff links, shoes and watches. And given that there are so few accessories permissible on a normal day one cannot wear a cummerbund every day. Neither is it very common to see men wearing hats or caps in todays time it is almost imminent for men to use all that they can in terms of accessories to make a suave impression. Wearing watches as part of daily dress is common in most cultures and countries and consequently mens watches have developed and reached great heights in quality and fashion sense.

Now that men have a way of expressing their taste and creativity, it is noticeable how much they ponder and choose while selecting a really good watch for themselves. And it is really no wonder that men are careful of the watches they wear and all the thought they put into buying one. Nowadays, it is common for a man to have more than one watch. One for formal events in basic black or brown, a metallic gold or silver one which is slightly dressier but still formal, and the others which are sporty or casual according to his taste are likely already on his list. Some of watches coming from designer houses have many features built into them and are bold to downright nerdy. There are even watches that tick backwards, in the counter-clockwise direction. There is nothing man has left unexplored. You can find watches that have monochrome dials with little detailing, dials with subtle basic colors that are very simple or the ones with lots of detailing and even an occasional gemstone studded into it.

The strap of the watch can be made of leather, if the man is the classic kind of guy. But if he is one who likes to explore and look for interesting variations, there are watches available in a range of metals --ranging from silver to pure gold, with a lot of choices of alloys in between. For a man, the value for money spent on a watch comes from the functionality as well as from the looks. There are some who look for special features like planners, programmable facilities, timers and stopwatches. Aviation and Navigation professionals have requirements which are fulfilled only by watches designed specifically for them. All these are collectibles, along with the more esoteric ones which show the phases of the moon, or indicate the prayer times according to the holy dictates of Islam.

There are several limited edition watches which come from designer watchmakers which have specific functions served by them. They offer amazing functionality in some aspect and are truly invaluable to the men who research and buy them with that purpose in mind. There are watches with Bluetooth connectivity which can act as tools for data transfer. There are others which are even useful for satellite navigation. The choices are virtually limitless in watches!

Saturday, August 14, 2010


Areas of fashion

Fashion as social phenomena is common. The rise and fall of fashion has been especially documented and examined in the following fields:


Architecture, interior design, and landscape design

Arts and crafts

Body type, clothing or costume, cosmetics, personal grooming, hairstyle, and personal adornment

Dance and music

Forms of address, slang, and other forms of speech

Economics and spending choices, as studied in behavioral finance

Entertainment, games, hobbies, sports, and other pastimes


Fast fashion

Management, management styles and different ways of organizing

Politics and media, especially the topics of conversation encouraged by the media

Philosophy and religion: although the doctrines of religions and philosophies change very slowly if at all, there can be rapid changes in what areas of a religion or a philosophy are seen as most important and most worth following or studying.

Social networks and the diffusion of representations and practices

Sociology and the meaning of clothing for identity-building

Technology, such as the choice of computer programming techniques

Hospitality industry, such as designer uniforms custom made for a hotel, restaurant, casino, resort or club, in order to reflect a property and brand.

Of these fields, costume especially has become so linked in the public eye with the term "fashion" that the more general term "costume" has mostly been relegated to something fancy dress or masquerade wear, while the term "fashion" means clothing generally, and the study of it. This linguistic switch is due to the so-called fashion plates which were produced during the Industrial Revolution, showing novel ways to use new textiles. For a broad cross-cultural look at clothing and its place in society, refer to the entries for clothing, costume and fabrics. The remainder of this article deals with clothing fashions in the Western world.


2008 runway show

Further information: History of Western fashion

The continually changing fashions of the West have been generally unparalleled either in antiquity or in the other great civilizations of the world until recent decades. Early Western travellers, whether to Persia, Turkey, Japan or China frequently remark on the absence of changes in fashion there, and observers from these other cultures comment on the unseemly pace of Western fashion, which many felt suggested an instability and lack of order in Western culture. The Japanese Shogun's secretary boasted (not completely accurately) to a Spanish visitor in 1609 that Japanese clothing had not changed in over a thousand years. However in Ming China, for example, there is considerable evidence for rapidly changing fashions in Chinese clothing.

Changes in costume often took place at times of economic or social change (such as in ancient Rome and the medieval Caliphate), but then a long period without large changes followed. This occurred in Moorish Spain from the 8th century, when the famous musician Ziryab introduced sophisticated clothing styles based on seasonal and daily timings from his native Baghdad and his own inspiration to Crdoba, Spain. Similar changes in fashion occurred in the Middle East from the 11th century, following the arrival of the Turks who introduced clothing styles from Central Asia and the Far East.

The beginnings of the habit in Europe of continual and increasingly rapid change in styles can be fairly reliably dated to the middle of the 14th century, to which historians including James Laver and Fernand Braudel date the start of Western fashion in clothing. The most dramatic manifestation was a sudden drastic shortening and tightening of the male over-garment, from calf-length to barely covering the buttocks, sometimes accompanied with stuffing on the chest to look bigger. This created the distinctive Western male outline of a tailored top worn over leggings or trousers.

Marie Antoinette was a fashion icon

The pace of change accelerated considerably in the following century, and women and men's fashion, especially in the dressing and adorning of the hair, became equally complex and changing. Art historians are therefore able to use fashion in dating images with increasing confidence and precision, often within five years in the case of 15th century images. Initially changes in fashion led to a fragmentation of what had previously been very similar styles of dressing across the upper classes of Europe, and the development of distinctive national styles, which remained very different until a counter-movement in the 17th to 18th centuries imposed similar styles once again, finally those from Ancien Rgime in France. Though the rich usually led fashion, the increasing affluence of early modern Europe led to the bourgeoisie and even peasants following trends at a distance sometimes uncomfortably close for the elites - a factor Braudel regards as one of the main motors of changing fashion.

Albrecht Drer's drawing contrasts a well turned out bourgeoise from Nuremberg (left) with her counterpart from Venice. The Venetian lady's high chopines make her taller

Ten 16th century portraits of German or Italian gentlemen may show ten entirely different hats, and at this period national differences were at their most pronounced, as Albrecht Drer recorded in his actual or composite contrast of Nuremberg and Venetian fashions at the close of the 15th century (illustration, right). The "Spanish style" of the end of the century began the move back to synchronicity among upper-class Europeans, and after a struggle in the mid 17th century, French styles decisively took over leadership, a process completed in the 18th century.

Though colors and patterns of textiles changed from year to year, the cut of a gentleman's coat and the length of his waistcoat, or the pattern to which a lady's dress was cut changed more slowly. Men's fashions largely derived from military models, and changes in a European male silhouette are galvanized in theatres of European war, where gentleman officers had opportunities to make notes of foreign styles: an example is the "Steinkirk" cravat or necktie.

The pace of change picked up in the 1780s with the increased publication of French engravings that showed the latest Paris styles; though there had been distribution of dressed dolls from France as patterns since the 16th century, and Abraham Bosse had produced engravings of fashion from the 1620s. By 1800, all Western Europeans were dressing alike (or thought they were): local variation became first a sign of provincial culture, and then a badge of the conservative peasant.

Although tailors and dressmakers were no doubt responsible for many innovations before, and the textile industry certainly led many trends, the history of fashion design is normally taken to date from 1858, when the English-born Charles Frederick Worth opened the first true haute couture house in Paris. Since then the professional designer has become a progressively more dominant figure, despite the origins of many fashions in street fashion.

Modern Westerners have a wide choice available in the selection of their clothes. What a person chooses to wear can reflect that person's personality or likes. When people who have cultural status start to wear new or different clothes a fashion trend may start. People who like or respect them may start to wear clothes of a similar style.

Fashions may vary considerably within a society according to age, social class, generation, occupation, and geography as well as over time. If, for example, an older person dresses according to the fashion of young people, he or she may look ridiculous in the eyes of both young and older people. The terms fashionista or fashion victim refer to someone who slavishly follows the current fashions.

One can regard the system of sporting various fashions as a fashion language incorporating various fashion statements using a grammar of fashion. (Compare some of the work of Roland Barthes.)


Fashion shot from 2006

An important part of fashion is fashion journalism. Editorial critique and commentary can be found in magazines, newspapers, on television, fashion websites, social networks and in fashion blogs.

At the beginning of the 20th century, fashion magazines began to include photographs or (PicS) and became even more influential than in the past. In cities throughout the world these magazines were greatly sought-after and had a profound effect on public taste. Talented illustrators drew exquisite fashion plates for the publications which covered the most recent developments in fashion and beauty. Perhaps the most famous of these magazines was La Gazette du Bon Ton which was founded in 1912 by Lucien Vogel and regularly published until 1925 (with the exception of the war years).

Vogue, founded in the US in 1892, has been the longest-lasting and most successful of the hundreds of fashion magazines that have come and gone. Increasing affluence after World War II and, most importantly, the advent of cheap colour printing in the 1960s led to a huge boost in its sales, and heavy coverage of fashion in mainstream women's magazines - followed by men's magazines from the 1990s. Haute couture designers followed the trend by starting the ready-to-wear and perfume lines, heavily advertised in the magazines, that now dwarf their original couture businesses. Television coverage began in the 1950s with small fashion features. In the 1960s and 1970s, fashion segments on various entertainment shows became more frequent, and by the 1980s, dedicated fashion shows like FashionTelevision started to appear. Despite television and increasing internet coverage, including fashion blogs, press coverage remains the most important form of publicity in the eyes of the industry.

Fashion Editor, Sharon Mclellan said, "There's a misconception in the industry that TV, magazines and blogs dictate to the consumer, what to wear. But most trends aren't released to the public before consulting the target demographic. So what you see in the media is a result of research of popular ideas among the people. Essentially, fashion is a group of people bouncing ideas off of one another, like any other form of art."

Intellectual property

Within the fashion industry, intellectual property is not enforced as it is within the film industry and music industry. To "take inspiration" from others' designs contributes to the fashion industry's ability to establish clothing trends. Enticing consumers to buy clothing by establishing new trends is, some have argued, a key component of the industry's success. Intellectual property rules that interfere with the process of trend-making would, on this view, be counter-productive. In contrast, it is often argued that the blatant theft of new ideas, unique designs, and design details by larger companies is what often contributes to the failure of many smaller or independent design companies.

In 2005, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) held a conference calling for stricter intellectual property enforcement within the fashion industry to better protect small and medium businesses and promote competitiveness within the textile and clothing industries.

See also

Look up fashion in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Fashion

Fashion accessory

Fashion capital

Fashion Net

Fashion week

Sustainable fashion

List of fashion designers

List of fashion topics

Runway (fashion)


^ For a discussion of the use of the terms "fashion", "dress", "clothing" and "costume" by professionals in various disciplines, see Valerie Cumming, Understanding Fashion History, "Introduction", Costume & Fashion Press, 2004, ISBN 0-8967-6253-X

^ Braudel, 312-3

^ Timothy Brook: "The Confusions of Pleasure: Commerce and Culture in Ming China" (University of California Press 1999); this has a whole section on fashion.

^ al-Hassani, Woodcok and Saoud (2004), 'Muslim Heritage in Our World', FSTC publisinhg, pp. 38-9

^ Terrasse, H. (1958) 'Islam d'Espagne' une rencontre de l'Orient et de l'Occident", Librairie Plon, Paris, pp.52-53.

^ Josef W. Meri & Jere L. Bacharach (2006). "Medieval Islamic Civilization: A-K". Taylor & Francis. p. 162. 

^ Laver, James: The Concise History of Costume and Fashion, Abrams, 1979, p. 62

^ Fernand Braudel, Civilization and Capitalism, 15th-18th Centuries, Vol 1: The Structures of Everyday Life," p317, William Collins & Sons, London 1981

^ Braudel, 317-24

^ Braudel, 313-15

^ Braudel, 317-21

^ Thornton, Peter. Baroque and Rococo Silks.

^ James Laver and Fernand Braudel, ops cit


^ Intellectual Property in Fashion Industry, WIPO press release, December 2, 2005

^ INSME announcement: WIPO-Italy International Symposium, 30 November - 2 December 2005

Further reading

Cumming, Valerie: Understanding Fashion History, Costume & Fashion Press, 2004, ISBN 0-8967-6253-X

Meinhold, Roman (2008) Meta-Goods in Fashion Myths. Philosophic-Anthropological Implications of Fashion Myths. In: Prajna Vihara. Journal of Philosophy and Religion. Bangkok, Assumption University. Vol.8., No.2, July-December 2007. 1-17. ISSN 1513-6442

External links

Fashion at the Open Directory Project

v d e

History of Western fashion


Ancient World in General  Roman


Byzantine  Early Medieval  Anglo-Saxon  12th century  13th century  14th century

Renaissance and Reformation

15th century  15001550  15501600  16001650  16501700

Enlightenment to Regency

17001750  17501795  17951820  1820s


1830s  1840s  1850s  1860s  1870s  1880s  1890s


1900s  1910s

Between the World Wars

1920s  19301945

Cold War

19451959  1960s  1970s  1980s


1990-2009  20002009 in fashion  2010-present

v d e



Cotton  Fur  Leather  Linen  Nylon  Polyester  Rayon  Silk  Spandex  Wool


Blouse  Crop top  Dress shirt  Halterneck  Henley shirt  Hoodie  Jersey  Guernsey (clothing)  Polo shirt  Shirt  Sleeveless shirt  Sweater  T-shirt  Tube top  Turtleneck

Trousers or pants

Bell-bottoms  Bermuda shorts  Bondage pants  Boxer shorts  Capri pants  Cargo pants  Culottes  Cycling shorts  Dress pants  Jeans  Jodhpurs  Overall  Parachute pants  Phat pants   Shorts  Sweatpants  Windpants


A-line skirt  Ballerina skirt  Fustanella  Hobble skirt  Jean skirt  Job skirt  Leather skirt  Kilt  Men's skirts  Microskirt  Miniskirt  Pencil skirt  Poodle skirt  Prairie skirt  Rah-rah skirt  Sarong  Skort  Slip  Train  Wrap


Ball gown  Cocktail dress  Evening gown  Gown  Jumper dress  Little black dress  Petticoat  Sari  Sundress  Tea gown  Wedding dress

Suits and uniforms

Academic dress  Afrocentric suit  Black tie  Buddhist monastic robe  Clerical clothing  Court dress  Gymslip  Jumpsuit  Lab coat  Mao suit  Morning dress  Pantsuit  Red Sea rig  Scrubs  Stroller  Tangzhuang  Tuxedo  White tie


Abaya  Academic gown  Anorak  Apron  Blazer  Cloak  Coat  Duffle coat  Frock coat  Jacket  Greatcoat  Hoodie  Opera coat  Overcoat  Pea coat  Poncho  Raincoat  Redingote  Robe  Shawl  Shrug  Ski suit  Sleeved blanket  Top coat  Trench coat  Vest  Waistcoat  Windbreaker


Boxer briefs  Boxer shorts  Brassiere  Briefs  Compression shorts  Corselet  Corset  Knickers  Lingerie  Long underwear  Men's undergarments  Panties  Teddy  Trunks  Undershirt


Belly chain  Belt  Bow tie  Chaps  Coin purse  Earring  Gaiters  Gloves  Handbag  Leg warmer  Leggings  Necklace  Necktie  Scarf  Stocking  Sunglasses  Suspenders  Tights


Athletic shoe  Boot  Dress shoe  Flip-flops  Hosiery  Pump  Sandal  Shoe  Slipper  Sock


Balaclava  Cap  Fascinator  Gaung Paung  Hat  Headband  Helmet  Hijab  Hood  Kerchief  Mantilla  Niqb  Sombrero  Turban  Ushanka  Veil


Babydoll  Blanket sleeper  Negligee  Nightcap  Nightgown  Nightshirt  Peignoir  Pajamas


Bikini  Swim diaper  Wetsuit

Clothing parts

Back closure  Buckle  Button  Buttonhole  Collar  Cuff  Elastic  Fly  Hemline  Hook-and-eye  Lapel  Neckline  Pocket  Shoulder pad  Shoulder strap  Sleeve  Snap  Strap  Velcro  Waistline  Zipper

National costume

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Historical garments

Banyan  Bedgown  Bodice  Braccae  Breeches  Breeching  Brunswick  Chemise  Chiton  Chlamys  Doublet  Exomis  Farthingale  Frock  Himation  Hose  Houppelande  Jerkin  Justacorps  Palla  Peplos  Polonaise  Smock-frock  Stola  Toga  Tunic

History and surveys

Africa  Ancient Greece  Ancient Rome  Ancient world  Anglo-Saxon  Byzantine  Clothing terminology  Dress code  Early Medieval Europe  Formal wear  Han Chinese clothing  History of clothing and textiles

Friday, August 6, 2010

India Men's Week Celebrity and Fashion Advice

It's the world's fourth and India's first exclusive Men's Week.  With an impressive list of designers, the Van Heusen India Men's Week is all set to dazzle the capital from 11th Sep to 13th Sep. But just as all good things come with a heavy price, the brainchild of Suniel Sethi is being put under the scanner too. Questions like clash of interest between sponsors and designers, clash of dates with KFW, strategies to attract more buyers, focus on local or international sales, and has the idea generated from Lakme Fashion Week in the first place, since the latter started a trend of sorts by dedicating a day to Men's fashion; come to the fore. caught up with fashion buffs to get the industry reactions. The more you ask, the more you get. Prima facie reactions are all for the Van Heusen India Men's Week, so let's just sit back and enjoy the show.

Effortlessly stylish, the Spring-Summer 2010 collection by Rocky S screams attitude. With this new collection, the designer who is known for designing and adorning celebrities and fashion aficionados is all set to woo the capital at the upcoming India Men's Week. The designer borrows inspiration from the traveller who is free spirited, easy going, calm in attitude and goes by his spiritual beliefs. "Through these visits, he gets allured and motivated to imbibe the striking and vital elements of each place. This is what one can expect from my collection," Rocky summarized with a delightful smile on his face.

Offering detailed information about the texturising and tailoring he has adopted, Rocky shared, "I am here to experiment and this upcoming line targets all those men who are in a mood of experimentation and want to try a new image and go for that killer's look." The line has been created in an array of interesting fabrics which include crushed voiles, mulmuls, linens, silks, emphasized with various kinds of knits, textured fabrics, leather, brocades, jacquard blends, and other cotton blends. Accentuating the bohemian look, the garments have been given an easy-going feel with a washed out, aged and distressed look.

The colours are black, ivory, burnt orange, ochre, deep red and many such brighter shades. He has treated the fabrics with different chemicals and has gone through n number of processes like crushing, industrial machine washing and other heat and chemical treatments to offer that washed out and worn out effect. He wasn't too comfortable in revealing the look that he is planning for the models- "The look is going to be relaxed with easy to wear and aged styled garments accentuated with printed scarves and textured bags.